Of all the various eras of theatrical history, the Middle Ages might seem like one of the least immediately relevant to the concerns of the 21st century. However, Kyle A. Thomas and Dr. Carol Symes of the University of Illinois think that medieval theatre’s never been more timely, and they’re staging a fascinating work, known as the The Play of Adam, to prove it. In this episode, Kyle and Carol discuss their production, which will run December 17-18 at The Cloisters at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, as well as the dynamic, inventive theatrical context that gave rise to plays like Adam.

Apse of the Church of San Martin at Fuentidueña. This 12th-century Spanish chapel has been relocated to New York City, where it is now a part of The Cloisters at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It is also the location for Kyle and Carol's production of The Play of Adam.

Links:

  • Read Carol’s translation of The Play of Adam.
  • Check out the Fuentidueña Chapel, the gorgeous 12th-century setting for the production.
  • Find out when and where you can see The Play of Adam performed.

Note: apologies for the poor audio quality of this episode. The podcast has been dealing with some technical issues, which have since been resolved, that affected the quality of a few episodes. Thanks for your patience and understanding.

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