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Greg Redlawsk

Greg Redlawsk is a director and playwright based out of New York. He is a co-founder of That Toy Pony, a young company devoted primarily to new and innovative site-specific performance throughout the city. A graduate of Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, he has also served as a Stage Manager, Technician, and Production Assistant throughout the city. Additionally, he worked administratively with New York Theater Workshop and the Public Theater on Shinsai: Theaters for Japan in 2012 and is now the Production Coordinator for "terntable," NYTW’s intern alumni organization. 

Ask if it’s Equity—Maybe
Essay

Ask if it’s Equity—Maybe

28 November 2014

Are Equity tours of a higher quality than non-union productions? Very possibly. There’s a larger talent pool to work with and performers tend to be more experienced. That said, whether or not a tour is a union production has never been shown to have a demonstrable effect on ticket sales that I’ve been able to uncover.

Paying Dues and the Social Contract
Essay

Paying Dues and the Social Contract

9 August 2014

“Paying your dues”—it’s a pervasive refrain, and one that clearly lives deeply within us; it has gotten under our skin and through our veins. I can’t help but think that it’s a lie. The concept of “paying dues” implies a sort of social contract that’s simply no longer present, if it ever was.

Unpaid Internships, or Getting Your Foot in the Door of the American Theater
Essay

Unpaid Internships, or Getting Your Foot in the Door of the American Theater

11 April 2014

A sampling of some of the major non-profits suggests that there are at least, on average, 8 to 10 unpaid interns working at any given time in the average mid to large sized non-profit theater. There are over 300 non-profit theaters of varying sizes in New York alone. Even with conservative estimates, there are at least a thousand interns, (probably more) working tens of thousands of unpaid hours for the non-profit sector. There are hundreds of PAs. We’ve created a system that’s built on the backs of unpaid young people who just want to be a part of things.