Anticolonial Creative Collaboration and the Development of Mirror Butterfly

We live in a time almost unparalleled in our consciousness of social justice. Millions and millions of people, from the global north to the global south, understand the existential threat of climate change, of perpetual war, of perpetual patriarchy. We understand that, absent a course correction, we are headed into a future that is dim in prospects for food security, human rights, quality of life—for any life at all.

And yet global decolonization and de-patriarchalization remains as elusive as ever. The battle of Standing Rock reminded us that human rights violations against people of color and ecocide grow up together; a deforested and Indigenous-less Amazon would almost immediately spell a global climate tipping point, reversing the rainforest’s attributes as net-remover of carbon and accelerating the greenhouse gas effect exponentially. Traditional Indigenous territories inhabit 22 percent of the world’s land surface, an area that contains 80 percent of the planet’s biodiversity. Amidst threats of mass extinction, Indigenous communities from Standing Rock to Suriname to Bolivia have vowed to continue their centuries-long work against environmental destruction by vowing (and succeeding) to battle gas companies, loggers, governments, and cartels.

As musician-activists—self-called “artivists”—based in the United States, we wanted to develop a collaborative jazz opera rooted in the defense of nature and Indigenous social movements. After taking part in the Community Supported Art Series residency at New Hazlett Theater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, we decided, alongside our collaborative team of Peggy Myo-Young Choy (choreographer) and Ruth Margraff (librettist), to create a devised work that integrated the political vision, sacred insects, sacred plants, and values of three revolutionary women: Reyna Lourdes Anguamea (of the Yaqui nation based in Sonora, Northern Mexico), Azize Aslan (of the Kurdish Freedom Movement), and Mama C (a veteran of the Black Panther Party, now doing community work and homesteading in Tanzania). These three remarkable women became our friends, allies, and comrades as we conducted interviews, workshopped the script, and set the piece to music. Having their voices at the center, rather than as subjects we hoped to represent, made this opera an organic expression of social movements as opposed to a study of artistic colonial anthropology.

actors onstage

The cast and ensemble of Mirror Butterfly. Photo taken by Renee Rosensteel and provided courtesy of the New Hazlett Theater.

Travels to Mexico

We wanted to create a work that truly crossed borders and built international solidarity, so, in 2018, we traveled to Obregon, Mexico to develop the plot and language with Yaqui activists.

The Yaqui people inhabit the valley of the Río Yaqui in the Mexican state of Sonora and in Arizona. They are notable for their successful resistance to the Spanish conquest—they were one of the few first nations to retain their autonomy and were even celebrated by United States general William Sherman as the “spartans of the Americas.” The majority of the Yaqui nation still lives in Sonora despite over a century of forced relocation intensified under Porfirio Díaz and current attacks on their ancestral water source, the Yaqui River. The ironically named “independence aqueduct pipeline” has diverted so much water from their territory that today thousands of Yaqui people suffer from gastrointenstinal problems due to water scarcity and pollution.

We were aware of the intensity of oppression the Yaqui people had been enduring, but when we visited, its scale and immediacy eclipsed what we had imagined. A leading Yaqui activist and spokesperson, Mario Luna, has been fighting the water extraction of the Yaqui river for decades. When we visited, we learned that the threats on his family’s life, both verbal and physical, had increased to the point that he was forced to install barbed wire and cameras.

Having their voices at the center, rather than as subjects we hoped to represent, made this opera an organic expression of social movements as opposed to a study of artistic colonial anthropology.

The resilience of the Yaqui community against the provocations of the Mexican state made us reflect on our commitment as artivists. We were inspired by artists such as the Mexican/Chinese-American performance and multimedia artist Richard Lou, who has been committed to the practice of border art for over twenty years. Our artivism was fueled by a “commitment to a transformation of the self and the world through creative expression” in which arts can help us imagine and construct a world beyond borders, exploitation, and racial, gendered, and environmental oppression. We were also influenced by the Kelly Strayhorn Theater’s Futuremakers program, which challenged us to think critically about how cultural expression can be a force for creative placekeeping, in opposition to gentrification and capital. In Sonora, these questions took on an existential intensity that was difficult to be prepared for. We encountered conditions that were truly challenging for the Yaqui people, as well as a warmth and hospitality that felt revolutionary. We asked ourselves many questions: What would a collaborative work look like in this context? Would it be documentary-based, dramatizing the struggle against water usurpation? Would the piece announce the whispers of a new world, foregrounding the formation of the National Indigenous Congress (CNI)? How concrete or surrealist could it be? Did it need to follow the logic of linear plot and linear time—or linear music, for that matter?

We met the director of the Yaquis Museum, Reyna Lourdes Anguamea, also a Yaqui lawyer and cultural guardian, and asked her, over dinner, what a meaningful staged work would look like that spoke to the Yaqui struggle and the alternative proposed by the CNI. She gave us the idea for how we should shape our jazz opera. It would revolve around the cry of a sacred endangered insect, the Kautesamai, otherwise known as the four-mirrored butterfly. This insect is in danger of going extinct due to the prevalent use of pesticides in the area and the vanishing of the Yaqui river ecosystem. Inspired, we were also immediately concerned: we did not want to profit off her ideas. We set out to create a dual live show and album, agreeing that the proceeds of the album—all of them—would fund Namakasía Radio, which offers a communication channel for the Yaqui River defense group. This way, we could also educate audiences about their struggle. The project would be named Mirror Butterfly: the Migrant Liberation Movement Suite, and the piece’s main character would be the Kautesamai. This is what our solidarity looked like.

two people in an auto

Gizelxanath Rodriguez and Mario Luna driving through Yaqui territory in Sonora, Mexico. Mario is pointing out sites where the river no longer runs due to aqueduct construction and other forms of diversion.

In dialogue with our United States–based collaborators, Margaff and Myo-Young Choy, and in conversations, study sessions, and interviews with our Yaqui collaborators, we began to create our story. We were encouraged by Reyna and others to think globally, considering other experiences of communities on the front lines of environmental struggle. With that in mind, we decided we would also tell the stories and freedom dreams of the Kurdish Freedom Movement. Like the National Indigenous Congress and the Yaqui River Defense Group, this movement offered a different form of governance that came from democractic traditions outside of Western liberalism: rotating non-hierarchical leadership, communal economics, the prevalence of women leadership, and the defense of water and ecosystems as paramount.

The Kurdish people, based in Syria, have witnessed a historic exodus of their people—over five million refugees have left the nation in a conflict several analysts have linked to climate change and ecological catastrophe. Given that our work aims to raise up the voices of environmental protectors who are building solutions that reverse the destruction wrought by capitalist economics and climate change, this felt like a natural step.

There are multiple levels to the work, but colonization took five hundred years to bring us here, and we will need at least five hundred years to build out of it.

Travels to Iraq

As part of the development of Mirror Butterfly, we spent a lot of time “building” politically, emotionally, and artistically in order to create something organic. Our intention with the jazz opera was to highlight the economic and social alternatives proposed by activists living in migrant-sending regions across the world—alternatives that, if embraced, could create stable and life-generating communities rooted in social justice. With that in mind, we connected with Azize Aslan, a revolutionary economist and member of the Kurdish Freedom movement.

Overlooked in the Western press, this remarkable revolutionary movement has liberated huge sections of the Rojava region in Syria and implemented “democratic confederalism,” which converges with ecosocialism through decentralization, gender equality, and local governance. One group within this movement, Make Rojava Green Again, works to push back against “the capitalist mentality and state violence against society and the environment.” For several decades under the Baath regime, the people in Rojava were forbidden to plant trees and vegetables. The politics were repressive and there was a deliberate underdevelopment of the region so the population had to migrate, as cheap labour, to nearby cities like Aleppo, Raqqa, and Homs.

Azize, like our Yaqui comrades, shared with us a philosophy of nature, which greatly influenced Mirror Butterfly. We interviewed her about her violently mobile life in which the Turkish state, as with the Baath regime, consistently disrupted the social bonds and entire communities of the Kurdish people. On the move, her family was forced to perform wage labor in hazelnut fields when their subsistence farming basis was destroyed. Eventually her community was forced to move to the megalopolis of Antalya, where nature was “othered.” The story of the sacred Kautesamai, on the brink of extinction, spoke to her, and her stories helped us created another character in the jazz opera, the stoneflower.

two actors onstage

Nejma Nefertiti and Peggy Myo-Young Choy in a scene where the Stoneflower gains balance and clarity from her interaction with the "snail" energy of the Zapatistas. Photo taken by Renee Rosensteel and provided courtesy of the New Hazlett Theater.

Through Azize and her comrades, we were able to travel to Kurdistan, Iraq, in 2019 to present Mirror Butterfly at the Mesopotamain Water Forum (MWF), where the jazz opera resonated with attendees. (As a young work, we still have not had the chance to perform it in Mexico.) The MWF was organized and attended by over 180 water activists from the Mesopotamia region and other countries in order to provide a civil society–led plan to restore disrupted hydrological cycles, which have created conditions of severe water scarcity in the region. One of the outcomes of this conference was internationalizing the campaign to prevent the flooding of the ancient city of Hasankeyf, whose population is predominantly Kurdish. Much of the city and its archeological sites are at risk of being flooded with the completion of the Ilisu Dam, which Turkey is rushing to construct despite mounting pressure as part of its indirect war against Kurdistan.

We were deeply moved by the Kurdish organizers’ commitment to feminism and ecological justice, but more generally it was clear that we were in the middle of a broader Middle Eastern environmental movement with cross-class, cross-national, and cross-ethnic linkages. We learned about widespread protests against dam construction by farmers in Iran, which was connected to the labor movement, and that young Iraqi environmentalists had petitioned on behalf of an Iranian environmental-labor activist while he was in solitary confinement. We told those we met about the Yaqui struggles, which they were interested in, and we were treated to food, hookah, and even invited to return to canoe down the Euphrates river as part of revitalizing ancestral Iraqi boat-making traditions. In April in northern Iraq, this is what our solidarity looked like: smoking hookah, working on the ground with the people, getting to know them, making music with them. These connections at the intuitive level are part of what being an artivist is about.

An artivist is someone who can put aside ego, comfort, privilege, and even language difficulties to break bread and truly learn from those on the other side of empire.

Travels to Venezuela

Two years ago, before we had begun Mirror Butterfly, we had travelled to an Afro-descent maroon community in Veroes, Venezuela, to attend the First Ecosocialist International. The International was attended by over one hundred social movement leaders from across the world. There, these leaders developed a five-hundred-year plan of action for the survival of the planet and the human species. The participants included representatives of Indigenous social movements and ecological radical movements from five continents.

As we were building our jazz opera, we reached out to an inspiring woman activist who had been present at the International; her words and spirit, in turn, further helped shape Mirror Butterfly. When we met Mama C, a former Black Panther now living in Tanzania, we did not know we would someday work with her on Mirror Butterfly—we had not even conceptualized this work yet.

Then, last year, after a collaborative concert in New York City between Mama C and Afro Yaqui Music Collective, which we are a part of, we asked her if she would like to be one of the participants in the construction of our jazz opera about climate change, matriarchal women warriors, and the revolution of all of our relations—with Earth, the climate, the very concept of gender, and the other. She agreed, creating a character for the show based on the mulberry tree, her favorite. At one point, she told us about her love for music. It is the music of Kansas City, the historical continuum of blues, jazz, and gospel, which contains rhythms of resistance that have animated struggle and self-determination for generations. We composed an aria in her honor with these influences in mind.

three person selfie

Ben Barson and Gizelxanath Rodriguez with Reyna Lourdes Anguamea in Vícam, Sonora, Mexico.

Artivism as Decolonization

We envision a world without a single authorial voice dominating a vision beyond accountability or relationality. Mirror Butterfly is both a piece of experimental theatre and a standalone album that brings audiences into dialogue with the radical solutions that have been devised by regions experiencing environmental crises sparked by industry and international capital: water protection, ecological transformation, community-based economics, and depatriarchalization. There are multiple levels to the work, but colonization took five hundred years to bring us here, and we will need at least five hundred years to build out of it. To get there, we feel the practice of artivism offers the potential for holistic transformation.

Our experiences showed us one path of what artivism looks like. An artivist is someone who can put aside ego, comfort, privilege, and even language difficulties to break bread and truly learn from those on the other side of empire. An artivist might travel across the world without a gig in mind or even a clear objective only to learn and possibly build international awareness of a struggle. As artivists, we look for ways we can change the consciousness of members of the collective and audience members, as well as build connections. One of the ways we did this was to organize a speaking tour with Mario Luna alongside our album release, where he educated audiences about the Yaqui struggle and its interconnection with the defense of life and water across the world.

Our own artivism took the form of creative and collaborative interaction on the basis of “the work”: talking about issues with the locals, learning from them, and creating work together—all with the intention of facilitating and strengthening international coalitions that articulate and construct an alternative future. These organizations, which go beyond governments and NGOs, which are built from civil society and the knowledge of the people on the ground, can help bridge social movements and forge organic resistance to the neofacisms of today in order to build the maroon communities of tomorrow.

Bookmark this page

Log in to add a bookmark

Interested in following this conversation in real time? Receive email alerting you to new threads and the continuation of current threads.

subscribe

Comments

0
Add Comment
Newest First