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David Bollier

David Bollier is an author, activist and Director of the Reinventing the Commons Program at the Schumacher Center for a New Economics.

David Bollier is an American activist, scholar, and blogger who is focused on the commons as a new paradigm for re-imagining economics, politics, and culture. He pursues this work as Director of the Reinventing the Commons Program at the Schumacher Center for a New Economics (Massachusetts, US), and as cofounder of the Commons Strategies Group, an international advocacy project. Bollier's blog, Bollier.org [www.bollier.org], is a widely read source of news about the commons, and his book Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons [www.thinklikeacommoner.com] (2014), has been translated into six languages. He and coauthor Silke Helfrich recently published a major reconceptualization of the commons, Free, Fair and Alive: The Insurgent Power of the Commons. Bollier co-founded the Washington, D.C. advocacy group Public Knowledge in the early 2000s; collaborated with television writer/producer Norman Lear for twenty-five years on political and public affairs projects; and worked with Ralph Nader in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  Bollier lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.

a group sitting around a conference table
The Promise of the Commons
Essay

The Promise of the Commons

10 October 2019

In honor of World Commons Week 2019, a working group of eleven US-based arts and cultural makers share their vision on how adopting a commons-based approach can help transform the arts into a more equitable and just field.

Power of the Commons with David Bollier
orange swirl under black book title free fair and alive
Video

Power of the Commons with David Bollier

Subtitle

at Emerson College, Boston, Massachusetts

Monday 30 September 2019
Boston, Massachusetts
Photo from Teatro Valle Occupato.
The Commoners Occupy Teatro Valle in Rome
Essay

The Commoners Occupy Teatro Valle in Rome

24 July 2014

The three-year occupation of Teatro Valle in Rome is now legendary: a spontaneous response to the failures of conventional government in supporting a venerated public theater, and the conversion of the theater into a commons by countless ordinary citizens. Now the mayor of Rome is threatening to end the occupation, evict the commoners, and privatize the management of the facility.