Tlaloc Rivas

Tlaloc is one of original framers and co-founder of the Latinx Theatre Commons and its' online platform, Café Onda. Since 2018, he has been a Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow for Carnegie Mellon University's School of Drama in Pittsburgh, PA.

Tlaloc Rivas writes, creates, and directs theatrical work, specializing in developing new, adventurous work, while also making the classics vitally alive for todays's audiences. He also creates and directs bilingual plays, works actively in civic engagement, and promotes equity and inclusion in all facets of his work in the academy and the professional theatre. He is currently adapting The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano ('Sesame Street') at Carnegie Mellon University. He recently devised La fuerza de Antígona, a new bilingual adaptation of Sophocles' Antigone, at The Theatre School at DePaul University. His new work, Divisadero, was recently named a finalist for The New Harmony Project 2019. His play, Johanna: Facing Forward, was Runner-Up in the MetLife Nuestras Voces National Playwriting Competition for 2016. Finally, he is the 2017 recipient of a Creation Fund Award from National Performance Network to write a new play based on the life of Rodolfo 'Corky' Gonzales. www.TlalocRivas.com

Medicine for Melancholy
Essay

Medicine for Melancholy

Letter to the Latinx actor living in Chicago

9 August 2016

Following a series of casting controversies in Chicago, Tlaloc Rivas offers counsel and perspective to Latinx actors while calling out theatres that practice whitewashing.

Directing Diverse Worlds
Essay

Directing Diverse Worlds

An Interview with Tlaloc Rivas

22 August 2014

As a Chicano director and writer, I am inspired by my own culture—the influence of poetry and magical realism, the contradictions and collision of European and Indigenous cultures, the corridos and huapangos of home, the memories of sitting on the porch hearing my family’s stories, and my own ever-growing inquiry into the nature of storytelling—from the specific to the universal—all came to mind in the design of the play.

What Happened When Critics Failed to Review My Latino Play?
Essay

What Happened When Critics Failed to Review My Latino Play?

30 April 2014

And although I’m proud of the production and of the nearly-all Latina/o creative team that gave Mariela en el Desierto an authentic voice, an issue arose as the last weekend of performances approached: No critics from the periodicals in the Atlanta area had attended or reviewed the show.

Photo from The Mahabharata.
What is Cultural Appropriation
Essay

What is Cultural Appropriation

Revisiting Peter Brook’s Mahabharata

6 February 2014

By allowing only a European/Western perspective to lead the artistic presentation of stories about class, race, and gender, are we continuing to allow those narratives to be appropriated, assimilated, or turned into the universal, etc. to the point of irrelevance? Perhaps in the attempt to distill a story to its essence there is a dilution that takes place at the hands of the dominant culture?

101 Plays by The New Americans, or on Latinidad
Essay

101 Plays by The New Americans, or on Latinidad

25 November 2013

Emerging from the  Latina/o Theatre Commons is a list of plays everyone should have access to. This list helps start jumpstart the exploration of (but not define) Latina/o theatre.

The Moment
Essay

The Moment

30 October 2013

This series on the Latina/o Theatre Commons explores the origins, journey, challenges and the future of Latina/o theater in America. This edition: Tlaloc Rivas remembers the moment he realized he was Chicano.

Cafe Onda logo.
Welcome to Café Onda!
Essay

Welcome to Café Onda!

20 September 2013

Bienvenidos! We would like to welcome you to Café Onda, an online gathering space in partnership with HowlRound that will feature regular content of the Latino/a Theatre Commons.

In Search of the Artistic Home
Essay

In Search of the Artistic Home

16 May 2012

Jamie Gahlon has asked theatre artists from around the country to talk about their personal search for an artistic home. Tlaloc Rivas continues this series.