Living the Dream Podcast # 6

Cameron Knight

When I was in college studying acting, we were told that there was a tried and true path to being a working actor. A path every actor worth respecting has trodden.

Now that I’ve taught acting for fifteen years, and watched the whole business utterly transform in the wake of all sorts of new developments, I’m wondering if that path we were told about in college still exists.

That’s the purpose of this podcast series. Over the next year, I am going to interview actors from all over. I am asking all kinds of actors to share why they act and how they act, in a world of diminished residuals, rising student loan interest rates, reduced network pick-ups, and a dying regional theatre circuit. How are actors faring as the business both widens its spectrum but also narrows the amount of available work? How did their training help prepare them for each and every day?

Cameron Knight is a force. He got his BFA from the University of Flint Michigan, got his MFA at the University of Delaware and is certified in Mesiner Technique from Larry Silverberg.

He’s acted onstage all over the country, including Fences at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Parlour Song by Jez Butterworth at Quantum Theatre, Lombardi at the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre and Othello with the Independent Shakespeare Company and the Texas Shakespeare Festival. He’s even been the voice of the Bee in the Honey Nut Cheerios commercials.

He is also one of the most important acting teachers in the country. He is now an Assistant Professor at The Theatre School at DePaul University, he’s also been a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, taught for the Stella Adler Academy of Arts and Theatre and Developed Curriculum for the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California.

He’s a bit of a superstar.

Theme song by Chris Martel & Ben Patey.

You can subscribe to this series via Apple iTunes or RSS Feed or just click on the link below to listen:

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Thoughts from the curator

In this podcast, I am interviewing all kinds of actors from all over to share why they act and how they act, in a world of diminished residuals, rising student loan interest rates, reduced network pick-ups, and a dying regional theatre circuit. How are actors faring as the business both widens its spectrum but also narrows the amount of available work? How did their training help prepare them for each and every day?

Living the Dream

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