fbpx "French and Yet Never French Enough" / « Français, mais jamais assez français » | HowlRound Theatre Commons

"French and Yet Never French Enough" / « Français, mais jamais assez français »

Caribbean Playwrights Challenge the Monolith of French Identity / Les dramaturges caribéens disputent l’identité française monolithique

Lire en français

Any translator worth their salt can tell you the real work of translation is not the literal (painstaking!) rendering of one language into another, but instead the necessary accompanying cultural translation that carries the meaning of the work. This challenge is all the more obvious when the text is a theatrical one, requiring the translator to become not only dramaturg for the script, but also, often, devoted advocate of and interpreter for the playwright—a duty that becomes vitally political when the writers are members of a marginalized community.

The sacred relationship between translator and playwright was put valiantly on display this past December, when CUNY’s Martin E. Segal Theatre Center welcomed francophones, francophiles, and theatre folks from around the world to witness staged readings of six French Caribbean plays in English translation and converse about the importance of global theatre exchange. All of this was part of the very first Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales Festival (Caribbean Theatre Project), co-curated by Stéphanie Bérard with Frank Hentschker. Creating space for francophone Caribbean stories, which are drastically underrepresented in the dissemination of French culture due to the forces of colonialism and white supremacy—despite the significant historical relationship between these geographical bodies—was central to the festival’s mission.

six people sit on a panel in front of a screen with their headshots on it.

Panel from the Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales (ACT) festival. Photo by Candace Thompson-Zachery. 

Jean-René Lemoine, a playwright whose work L’Adoration/Adoration was at the festival, explained the motivation behind his writing: “It’s the complexity of alterity that interests me. How all the languages, all the travels, all the exiles that make me what I am will perhaps be able to resonate within the imagination of those who hear the play.” This sentiment was shared by many of the Caribbean artists present at the festival. Eager to interrogate the specific complexity of their shared cultural identity—French and yet never French enough—these Caribbean artists strive to honor their heritage while participating in the marketplace and tradition of Western theatre.

As a white American woman who spends a fair amount of time in the interstitial space between French and English, France and the United States, I am familiar with the discomfort of not being understood, and the innumerable ways we humans attempt to understand. (Earlier this year, I tried to translate the concept of an intimacy director to a group of French playwrights, who were baffled by what they perceived to be the American litigious hypersensitivity of the role.) I take comfort in the idea that theatre is one way we can get closer to mutual understanding, by tapping into the universality of specific human experience.

Theatre is one way we can get closer to mutual understanding, by tapping into the universality of specific human experience

This universality was a recurring theme in the conversations on and off stage at the Caribbean Theatre Project. During the Caribbean Theatre on the International Stage panel, Luc Saint-Eloy, playwright of Trottoir chagrin/Street Sad, said: “Through theatre, I understood part of myself was amputated. I discovered my roots.” Saint-Eloy not only found role models through reading about his predecessors’ experience, but also validation of his non-linear identity as a French man of color who was born in Djibouti and raised in Guadeloupe, has lived in Paris since 1975, and yet is still rarely deemed a “French” theatremaker but rather a Caribbean one. This was something Daniely Francisque, playwright of Ladjable/She-Devil, also felt. During the opening panel, titled Women in/and Caribbean Theatre, Francisque said that after a lifetime lack of representation on stage, when she finally began writing her own plays, she wanted to scream who she was.

performer in red devil costume onstage.

Daniely Francisque's January 2018 premiere of Ladjable/She-Devil at Tropiques Atrium, Martinique's National Theatre. Photo by Peggy Fargues.

Of course, this Brechtian distancing—engaging with topics on a conscious rather than subconscious level, a pillar of the Caribbean diasporic people’s experience—offers a perpetual opportunity for critical examination of one’s own culture. All seven of the playwrights present at the conference (as well as several directors, other invited panelists, and audience members) spoke about the ways in which their work has been informed by circulating between the Francophone West Indies and mainland France. Given the premise of the project, all six of the plays were written in French, the colonizer’s language, with infusions of Creole in Francisque and Guy Régis Junior’s pieces. Francisque said Ladjable/She-Devil was written in “her” French, inspired by traditional storytellers who take possession of the colonial language and spin it for their own designs.

Oceana James, a Black American playwright originally born and raised in St. Croix, who was a panelist at the conference, reminded the audience that the major bullet points in Caribbean migration are the transatlantic slave trade, colonialism, race, and racism. She dispelled the idea of Caribbean insularity, speaking of the frequency of inter-Caribbean migration as islanders move for work, and the “Caribbean artists in exile” stereotype, raising the question of whether it was “selling out” not to live at home in the Caribbean. And yet she feels her circulation between New York and St. Croix has informed her voice and her artistry, and her understanding of her theatrical work and its impact is informed by her ability to present it in these divergent contexts. Saint-Eloy concurred, saying, “The longer I live in Paris, the more I know where I came from,” and that he sees theatre as a way of interrogating memory. Theatre not only allows us to investigate our identity, but to define ourselves.

The myth of universal French existence devalues individual experience and prevents diverse representation of the French population in popular media.

 

two performers in red costumes with a backdrop of the moon.

Daniely Francisque's January 2018 premiere of Ladjable/She-Devil at Tropiques Atrium, Martinique's National Theatre. Photo credit goes to Peggy Fargues.

However, contemporary French political discourse is not kind to communautarisme (ethnic identity politics). While American progressive discourse centers around equity, diversity, and inclusion, President Macron said just this past October, “Communautarisme isn’t terrorism,” as he refused to take a stance on whether or not it was appropriate for school chaperones to wear their hijab on field trips. French liberalism insists on a unified vision of Frenchness, one that remains white, socialist, and middle class, despite the fact that French citizens of color live in France and in the French-administered territories outside the European continent, mostly relics of colonial France, such as Guadeloupe and Martinique.

Gaël Octavia, playwright of Une vie familiale/Family, said in an interview, “As a Martinican, it’s completely normal to be both French and Martinican. It’s not until I got to France that I understood I wasn’t French.” By rejecting the inherent value of organizing around a shared core component of identity, the myth of universal French existence devalues individual experience and prevents diverse representation of the French population in popular media. As Francisque said, “We don’t see ourselves on French screens or stages. We’re systematically on the side. There is one way to be French.” And: “It’s difficult to be different in France. It’s difficult to be Black and French, in France.” She says it is a struggle to stand up and say, “I have specific things to say!” Combatting this underrepresentation was a driving force behind the work of many of those in attendance.

Bérard was intentional in selecting works for the festival by an equal number of men and women playwrights (actually four women and three men, as one play, Le jour où mon père ma tué/The Day My Father Killed Me was co-written by two women, Charlotte Boimare and Magali Solignat), from three Francophone Caribbean nations (Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Haiti). Feminist discourse was alive and well in the selection of plays and their central themes. Five of the six translators were women (myself included), as were four of the six directors of the staged readings. There was much discussion of the archetypical “poto mitan” Caribbean woman, who is expected to selflessly shoulder the responsibility for everyone around her.

three actors in a staged reading.

Reading of Le jour où mon père m'a tué/The Day My Father Killed Me at the Théâtre des Halles à Avignon. Photo by Sébastien Cotterot.

This consciousness surrounding representation was pervasive throughout the festival, starting with the Women in/and Caribbean Theatre panel, and was reflected in several questions during talkbacks about playwrights’ casting specifications and the varying receptions of the plays presented, depending on where they were staged. Candace Thompson-Zachery, the festival’s external artistic director, raised the notion of “legibility,” especially for work that’s non-Eurocentric, as a recurring conversation in her circles. She reported constantly having to respond to questions along the lines of, “Is your project to make your work legible to ‘mainstream’ audiences?” And, “Do you make work that you feel will translate well to a broader audience, or do you make work specifically for Caribbean audiences to engage with?”

Several playwrights expressed frustration in trying to garner French support for productions of their work, often being pigeonholed by their Caribbean identity.

Works in translation beg the question: “For whom are we telling these stories?” Some playwrights, such as Francisque, were vocal about their intent to fill the silence and to capture and transmit their culture’s folklore, including the story of the “she-devil” recounted in her play. Solignat spoke about her experience as an actor playing a négropolitaine (a negatively connotated word for a Black person born in mainland France) who is viewed with a certain disdain when they visit France’s overseas territories. Several playwrights expressed frustration in trying to garner French support for productions of their work, often being pigeonholed by their Caribbean identity.

The plays themselves ranged from the deeply intimate to the epic and folkloric. Trottoir chagrin/Street Sad told the “impossible love story” of a prostitute and a stalker, and L’Adoration/Adoration chronicled an obsessive love affair. Une vie familiale/Family peeled back the layers of secrecy and deception in a seemingly “normal” nuclear family, and Le jour où mon père m’a tué/The Day My Father Killed Me told the true story of a Guadeloupian radio DJ who murdered his son on the eve of his son’s eighteenth birthday. De toute la terre le grand effarement/And the Whole World Quakes presented a Godot-esque post-apocalyptic take on the aftermath of Haiti’s 2008 earthquake, and Ladjable/She-Devil spun a contemporary take on a traditional folk tale about a mythic seductress. Every play was laced with social commentary and violence, laying bare the playwrights’ grappling with pressing questions of identity, alterity, and belonging.

It does not feel like an exaggeration to say most of what I’ve learned about the world, I’ve learned through stories. What’s more, translation has strengthened my ability to constantly hold two (or more) simultaneous, differing realities in my head. As ardently as the playwrights and other Caribbean artists assembled at the Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales Festival wanted to dispel the white colonialist myth of their home as nothing more than beaches and good times, they also wanted to share the specificity of their experience and cultural context, as well as their families, traditions, language, music, and stories. Plays such as the ones presented in the Caribbean Theatre Project allow artists and audiences alike to share in the messy, collaborative, perfectly imperfect exercise of broadening our perspectives and listening for understanding, in languages both familiar and foreign.

****

N’importe quel traducteur digne de ce nom pourrait vous dire que le vrai travail de la traduction, ce n’est pas la traduction (rigoureuse) au sens littéral, mais la traduction culturelle nécessaire à porter la signification de l’ouvrage. Ce défi est d’autant plus évident quand il s’agit d’un texte dramatique, demandant au traducteur de devenir non seulement dramaturge (au sens anglais du terme) pour le texte, mais aussi, souvent, défenseur dévoué et interprète du dramaturge (au sens français du terme) –, un devoir qui devient hautement politique quand les dramaturges font partie d’une communauté marginalisée.

Cette relation sacrée, entre le traducteur et le dramaturge, a été vaillamment mise en valeur en décembre dernier, quand le Martin E. Segal Theatre Center à New York a accueilli des francophones, des francophiles et des gens de théâtre de partout dans le monde pour assister aux lectures publiques de six pièces franco-caribéennes traduites en anglais, et pour discuter de l’importance des échanges internationaux au théâtre. Tout cela faisait partie du premier festival Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales (ACT), coorganisé par Stéphanie Bérard et Frank Hentschker. Créer un espace pour les histoires franco-caribéennes, radicalement sous-représentées dans la diffusion de la culture française à cause du colonialisme et de la suprématie blanche – malgré la relation historique importante entre ces territoires géographiques –, était central dans la mission du Festival.

six people sit on a panel in front of a screen with their headshots on it.

Panel from the Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales (ACT) festival. Photo by Candace Thompson-Zachery. 

Jean-René Lemoine, dramaturge dont la pièce L’Adoration a été présentée au Festival, explique la motivation derrière son écriture : « C’est la complexité de l’altérité qui m’intéresse. Comment toutes les langues, tous les voyages, tous les exils qui font de moi ce que je suis pourront peut-être entrer en résonance avec l’imaginaire de ceux qui entendront la pièce ». Ce sentiment était partagé par plusieurs artistes caribéens présents au Festival. Désireux d’interroger la complexité particulière à l’identité culturelle qu’ils partagent–française, mais jamais assez française–, ces artistes caribéens luttent pour le respect de leur héritage, alors qu’ils participent au marché et à la tradition du théâtre occidental.

Étant moi-même une Blanche américaine passant une partie importante de sa vie dans l’espace interstitiel entre le français et l’anglais, entre la France et les États-Unis, je connais bien la gêne de ne pas être compris et les moyens innombrables que l’être humain utilise pour essayer de se faire comprendre. (Plus tôt cette année, j’ai essayé de traduire l’idée d’« intimacy director » à un groupe de dramaturges français, qui ont été déroutés parce qu’ils croyaient que je parlais de l’aspect litigieux de ce type de scènes aux États-Unis.) Je me console en pensant que le théâtre est un moyen par lequel on peut tendre vers une compréhension mutuelle, en puisant dans l’universalité d’expériences humaines singulières.

Le théâtre est un moyen par lequel on peut tendre vers une compréhension mutuelle, en puisant dans l’universalité d’expériences humaines singulières.

Cette universalité était un thème récurrent dans les conversations sur scène et dans les coulisses lors du festival Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales. Pendant le panel Le théâtre caribéen sur la scène internationale, Luc Saint-Eloy, auteur de Trottoir chagrin, a dit : « Et c’est [à travers le répertoire du théâtre afro-caribéen] que je comprends qu’il m’avait été amputé une partie de moi-même, parce que j’y ai découvert mes racines ». En apprenant de l’expérience de ses prédécesseurs, Saint-Eloy n’a pas seulement trouvé des modèles, mais aussi une validation de son identité non linéaire, en tant qu’homme français noir né à Djibouti et élevé en Guadeloupe, qui vit à Paris depuis 1975, et que l’on considère encore aujourd’hui rarement comme un homme de théâtre « français » , mais plutôt des Caraïbes. C’est quelque chose que Daniely Francisque, autrice de Ladjablès, a senti aussi. Pendant le panel d’ouverture, Women and/in Caribbean Theatre, Francisque a dit qu’après une éternité de représentation lacunaire sur scène, quand elle a finalement commencé à écrire ses propres pièces, elle voulait crier qui elle était.

performer in red devil costume onstage.

Daniely Francisque's January 2018 premiere of Ladjable/She-Devil at Tropiques Atrium, Martinique's National Theatre. Photo by Peggy Fargues.

Bien sûr, cet effet de distanciation–le traitement de sujets au niveau du conscient et non du subconscient, un pilier dans l’expérience de la diaspora caribéenne–offre une occasion perpétuelle pour l’examen critique de la culture. Les sept dramaturges présents à la conférence (ainsi que plusieurs metteurs en scène, des membres du panel invités et des spectateurs) ont parlé des façons dont leur travail a été influencé dans le va-et-vient entre les Antilles et la France hexagonale. Étant donné le propos du projet, les six pièces ont été écrites en français, la langue du pays colonisateur, avec des infusions de créole dans les pièces de Francisque et de Guy Régis Junior. Francisque a dit que Ladjablès a été écrit dans « son » français, inspiré par les griots qui prennent le contrôle de la langue coloniale et la retournent en tous sens pour leurs propres histoires.

Oceana James, une dramaturge noire américaine, originaire de Sainte-Croix et élevée là-bas, pendant un panel de la conférence, a rappelé au public que les problèmes importants de l’émigration caribéenne sont la traite transatlantique, le colonialisme, la race et le racisme. Elle a balayé l’idée de l’insularité caribéenne, parlant de l’émigration fréquente entre les îles caribéennes à cause du travail, et du stéréotype des « artistes caribéens en exil », soulevant la question de savoir si on se vendait quand on n’habitait plus chez soi, aux îles caribéennes. Or elle sent que ses déplacements entre New York et Sainte-Croix ont nourri sa voix et sa pratique artistique ; sa réflexion à propos de son travail dramatique et de son impact sont également nourris par la possibilité de le présenter dans ces deux différents contextes. Saint-Eloy abonde dans le même sens : « Plus ça fait longtemps que j’habite Paris, plus je sais d’où je viens » et il ajoute qu’il voit le théâtre comme un moyen d’interroger la mémoire. Le théâtre nous permet non seulement d’interroger notre identité, mais aussi de nous définir.

Le mythe de l’existence universelle française dévalue l’expérience de l’individu et empêche la représentation diversifiée de la population française dans les médias populaires.

two performers in red costumes with a backdrop of the moon.

Daniely Francisque's January 2018 premiere of Ladjable/She-Devil at Tropiques Atrium, Martinique's National Theatre. Photo credit goes to Peggy Fargues.

Cependant, le discours politique de la France contemporaine n’est pas gentil envers le communautarisme. Pendant que le discours américain progressif trouve son centre autour de l’équité, la diversité et la non-exclusion, le président Macron a dit, aussi récemment qu’en octobre dernier, « Le communautarisme, ce n’est pas le terrorisme » alors qu’il refusait de prendre position à savoir s’il était convenable ou non pour les accompagnatrices de porter la voile pendant les sorties scolaires. Le libéralisme français insiste sur une vision unie de ce que c’est d’être « français », une vision qui reste blanche, socialiste et de classe moyenne, en dépit du fait que les citoyens noirs français habitent la France et les départements d’outre-mer (DOM), qui sont plutôt des reliques de la France coloniale, comme la Guadeloupe et la Martinique.

Gaël Octavia, autrice d’Une vie familiale, raconte dans un entretien : « En tant que Martiniquaise, c’est tout à fait naturel d’être à la fois Française et Martiniquaise. Quand je suis arrivée en France hexagonale, c’est là que j’ai compris que je n’étais pas française ». En refusant à un groupe partageant les mêmes éléments d’identité la valeur intrinsèque de s’organiser, le mythe de l’existence universelle française dévalue l’expérience de l’individu et empêche la représentation diversifiée de la population française dans les médias populaires. Comme le dit Francisque : « On ne se voit pas sur les scènes ni les écrans français. On est systématiquement mis de côté. Il n’y a qu’un seul moyen d’être français. » Elle ajoute que c’est une épreuve, de se lever et de déclarer « Moi, j’ai des choses à dire ! » La lutte contre ce manque de représentation a joué un rôle moteur dans le travail de plusieurs personnes présentes au Festival.

Bérard a sélectionné délibérément les pièces d’un nombre paritaire de dramaturges hommes et femmes (en fait, quatre femmes et trois hommes, puisqu’une pièce, Le jour où mon père m’a tué, a été écrite par deux femmes, Charlotte Boimare et Magali Solignat), et issus de trois nations franco-caribéennes : la Martinique, la Guadeloupe et Haïti. Le discours féministe était bien portant dans les pièces sélectionnées, et leurs thèmes, centraux. Cinq des six traducteurs étaient des femmes (y compris moi-même), de même que quatre des six metteurs en scène des lectures publiques. Il y avait beaucoup de discussions autour de l'archétype de la femme caribéenne « potomitan » , qui doit par altruisme s’occuper de tout le monde qui l’entoure.

three actors in a staged reading.

Reading of Le jour où mon père m'a tué/The Day My Father Killed Me at the Théâtre des Halles à Avignon. Photo by Sébastien Cotterot.

Cette conscience de la représentation était omniprésente au Festival, en premier lieu dans le panel sur les femmes et/dans le théâtre caribéen (Women and/in Caribbean Theatre), et se reflétait dans plusieurs questions pendant les conversations avec le public après les lectures, questions sur le processus particulier des dramaturges dans la distribution des rôles et sur la réception variée des pièces, en fonction du lieu où elles ont été présentées. Candace Thompson-Zachery, la directrice artistique externe du Festival, a soulevé l’idée de la « lisibilité », surtout pour un travail qui n’est pas eurocentrique, comme étant un questionnement récurrent dans ses cercles. Elle a relaté qu’il fallait constamment répondre aux questions « Est-ce que vous projetez de rendre votre travail lisible au public populaire ? » et « Faites-vous une œuvre qui, selon vous, se traduira bien pour un public plus large, ou faites-vous une œuvre qui s’adresse seulement à un public caribéen ? »

Plusieurs dramaturges ont exprimé les frustrations qu’ils avaient vécues en essayant d’obtenir du soutien français pour la production de leur travail, du fait qu’ils étaient étiquetés comme caribéens.

Les œuvres traduites soulèvent la question : « Pour qui racontons-nous ces histoires ? » Quelques dramaturges, comme Francisque, sont clairs dans leur intention de remplir ce silence et de saisir et transmettre le folklore de leur culture, comme cette histoire de la diablesse, qu’elle raconte dans sa pièce. Solignat parle de son expérience comme actrice en jouant une « négropolitaine » qui est perçue avec un certain mépris quand elle visite des DOM. Plusieurs dramaturges ont exprimé les frustrations qu’ils avaient vécues en essayant d’obtenir du soutien français pour la production de leur travail, du fait qu’ils étaient étiquetés comme caribéens.

Les pièces elles-mêmes allaient de l’intimité extrême à l’épopée et au folklore. Trottoir chagrin raconte « une histoire d’amour impossible » entre une prostituée et un harceleur, et L’Adoration fait la chronique d’une histoire d’amour obsessionnelle. Une vie familiale expose les niveaux de secrets et de mensonges dans une famille semblant « normale », et Le jour où mon père m’a tué raconte l’histoire véridique d’un animateur radio guadeloupéen qui a tué son fils la veille de son dix-huitième anniversaire. De toute la terre le grand effarement présente une version post-apocalyptique des suites du tremblement de terre de 2008 en Haïti à la Godot, et Ladjablès offre la vision moderne d’un conte populaire traditionnel sur une séductrice mythique. Chaque pièce était tissée de commentaires sociaux et de violence, dévoilant des dramaturges aux prises avec des questions importantes sur l’identité, l'altérité et l’appartenance.

Il ne me semble pas exagéré de dire que la plus grande partie de ce que j’ai appris sur ce monde, je l’ai appris avec des histoires. D’ailleurs, la traduction a renforcé ma capacité à tenir constamment deux (ou plus) réalités simultanées et différentes dans ma tête. Aussi ardemment que les dramaturges et autres artistes caribéens rassemblés au festival Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales aient voulu chasser le mythe blanc colonial de chez eux comme s’il ne s’agissait que de plages et d’un peu de bon temps, ils voulaient également partager l’unicité de leur expérience et de leur contexte culturel, de même que leurs familles, traditions, langues, musique et histoires. Les pièces comme celles présentées au festival Actions Caribéennes Théâtrales permettent aux artistes et au public de partager l’exercice chaotique, collaboratif, parfaitement imparfait d’élargir notre perspective et d’écouter pour comprendre, dans des langues aussi connues qu’étrangères.

Bookmark this page

Log in to add a bookmark

Interested in following this conversation in real time? Receive email alerting you to new threads and the continuation of current threads.

subscribe

Comments

2
Add Comment

The article is just the start of the conversation—we want to know what you think about this subject, too! HowlRound is a space for knowledge-sharing, and we welcome spirited, thoughtful, and on-topic dialogue. Find our full comments policy here

Newest First

Interesting read! Both beautifully expressed and culturally stimulating. Any idea on where I can access the English translation for the 'Le jour où mon père m’a tué'?

Also, thanks for sharing Amelia.