fbpx Creativity in Strange Times / Creatividad en tiempos extraños | HowlRound Theatre Commons

Creativity in Strange Times / Creatividad en tiempos extraños

Making Performance with a "Lockdown Aesthetic" / Haciendo las obras con un "Lockdown Estética"

Leer en español

When the pandemic hit and preventive isolation began in Colombia, many organizations and artistic groups were scared by the distancing measures that forced them to close their physical spaces and cancel their events. They had all believed this would be a magnificent year for cultural and artistic practices. But it was not like that. The impact was immediate. It took all of us artists in Colombia by surprise, and we quickly began to reinvent ourselves.

While the organizations and artistic groups have suffered, we artists have been left without the possibility of attending workshops or physical practice spaces. As a young non-binary writer and performer in Bogotá focused on making visible my ideas around gender and social norms, living in a country like this is already an everyday struggle due to the discrimination and censuring of multiple expressions, and the pandemic added to the challenge, because practice and training are necessary every day.

a person seated at a desk with multiple screens

Self-creative space as a place to resist! Photo by Maria Camila Astorquiza.

What has happened, then, during this time without physical training spaces for artists? In the long months that have passed since isolation began, we have had to overcome the creative blocks related to the lack of spaces—theatres, practice rooms, street stages—and have been engaging in discussions about the new challenges, such as the control of our bodies produced by the confinement and public health policies, the rethinking of the staging of our works, and the reformulation of creative projects with the technological resources that we have. The discussions have definitely helped regenerate creation processes and have helped us realize new forms of reaching the public with our art. Since physical spaces have been forced to close, it has been necessary to open virtual ones and allow the public access to livestreaming or recorded content.

The pandemic has given us artists the opportunity to change this reality of cultural poverty, as the shift to virtual theatre allows us to explore these topics freely.

A Chance to Renovate Colombia’s Cultural Approaches

The new ways of virtual entertainment are varied and cover the most privileged forms of art, such as opera, chamber music, and national theatres, reaching young artists who commonly participate in the most dissident and underground events in Latin American countries. The internet and virtuality have given us the opportunity to create quality content. But if we are speaking about a country like Colombia, not everyone can access these art forms because many people don’t have the privilege of internet. It’s also important to note that prior to the pandemic, and due to corruption, there has been little to no support from the country around various art forms, as most themes or topics explored in arts and culture are about different kinds of violence, such as gender, identity, and Indigenous discrimination. However, the pandemic has given us artists the opportunity to change this reality of cultural poverty, as the shift to virtual theatre allows us to explore these topics freely.

black and white photo of two people in different masks facing each other through glass

La Tarima Invisible workshops held in Proyecto Binario. Photo by Carolina Vélez and Estefanía López.

All of this new cultural content has saturated the market. It can be easy to feel like it is necessary to see everything that comes out, but this is not so—the excess of content allows us to be more selective in what we want to see. And having access to all this content gives us the opportunity to be inspired and create.

As a Colombian artist and performer myself, my art has been influenced by musical works and bodywork, such as dance and contact improvement in different stagings, among other projects experienced during the pandemic—all created around the world. With the technological resources available to us artists, we have seen a regeneration of creative projects. For example, the projects I have developed during the pandemic are texts I write and then perform through Instagram about different feelings emerging from the anxiety produced by the lockdown, and I usually perform by expressing feelings of gender repression through a non-binary aesthetic of the body.

Something very interesting has happened: a virtual world has begun to develop, one of infinite possibilities and without borders, where nationalities do not matter.

Performance as a Rage-Manifesto

Different artistic groups in Colombia and Latin America have come together during lockdown and something very interesting has happened: a virtual world has begun to develop, one of infinite possibilities and without borders, where nationalities do not matter. People from all over the world join these gatherings and share their performances. It is an artistic way of destroying the controls that are threatening our bodies—both the physical and geographical ones brought on by the pandemic and the social ones inflicted on us from outside sources—and is a way to experience what other performative artists are creating during the lockdown.

The control strategies people and artists live under are generated by the cisnormative, white supremacist, heteronormative, and patriarchal system that governs the world. An example of this is how Mayor Claudia López of Bogotá—who is in fact the city’s first openly gay major—decided to use something called “Pico y Género” (a gender restriction) to control the spread of the virus, where people were divided by gender and not permitted to carry out their essential tasks on certain days. This led to fear and discrimination against transgender, non-binary, and agender individuals and led to violence and abuse by the police. In addition, there is also control in the form of the neglectful institutions, including the health and police departments, as they have always been dangerous state entities that refuse to help trans and LGBTQ+ people in Colombia. This kind of control led to the death of Alejandra Monocuco, a trans girl who was murdered due to the negligence of the state and the medical service. This fact, four days after the murder of George Floyd in the United States, has been a creative detonator in the face of social injustices and the control exercised by power mechanisms in the midst of the pandemic.

three actors onstage

La Tarima Invisibleworkshops held in Proyecto Binario. Photo by Carolina Vélez and Estefanía López.

In the face of this reality, artists and activists created various virtual manifestations. To show their indignation, some transfeminist and artistic collectives have been showcasing themselves and their work on livestreams to raise funds for the trans girls and sex workers community in Colombia. This has included having conversations about social activism and holding virtual parties where the underground scenes of gender and sexuality dissidents manifest—including collectives like Las Tupamaras, Putivuelta, and Balistikal, which carry out very interesting performance works of social activism. For example, Las Tupamaras offered a course in their performative practices, creating the opportunity to share their ways of performance creation with different artists; Putivuelta created virtual spaces to share different performances related to dance manifestos; and Balistikal opened a virtual space for the LGBTQ+ community called “Open Mic Night” to gather different artists in the fields of literature, acting, and music.

Now, with an array of technological resources at our disposal to produce artistic, performative, and multidisciplinary works, we artists can reflect on the space and time in which these social struggles are gestated. In the absence of physical spaces, the performances that occur now, in the midst of the pandemic, are filled with technological tools, visual effects, and archival sounds. On top of this, the aesthetic experiences that have come out of virtual productions are new for audiences, and, with this new way of appreciating art, new emotions and affections related to social struggles have emerged. Whether or not the work is focused on social causes, what is being presented will influence the impact and development of artistic practices in the near future.

Us Colombian performers have learned that our bodies can’t be locked up.

Bodies That Express New Times

Many collectives have done interesting work to represent these new challenges within multidisciplinary and performance creation. And these ways of creating are being thought of not only as practices for during the pandemic, but also as ones that can be part of the artists’ creative work outside the current situation.

For example, Proyecto Binario, a cultural center in the city of Bogotá dedicated to the production, management, and execution of cultural projects and practices, began this year working on multidisciplinary projects within its physical space. However, given the pandemic, the organization quickly migrated to a virtual space where, together with PopUp Art Colombia, Colectivo Canario, Distorsión [es], and others, they began to ask the following question: “What happens when the stage event is dislocated and displaced to a virtuality?” Thanks to this question, La Tarima Invisible (The Invisible Stage) was born, a project that reformulates the space of the staging in the following manifesto:

The stage is not a space, although it has spatial dimensions. Neither is it an object, even if it has material effects. The stage is a relationship, it is what happens between what emerges from the encounter with myself, other, and a situation. The stage emerges from the relationships involved in the stage event and, therefore, it is a performance matter.

Ana Contreras, who works with the Colectivo Canario and is a creator of performances for La Tarima Invisible, shares her interesting experience about time within the creation of her performative pieces: “Now when I try to compose a structure in my creative process it is very difficult for me, because I feel that time is diluted in the middle of confinement,” she says. “So when my processes go through the body, that liquidity and not solidity of time is reflected in my work.”

an actor onstage

Ana Contreras in La Tarima Invisible. Photo by Juan Pablo Andrade.

These reflections from independent collectives contribute to this initial question about creation. It is striking that, in fact, when this pandemic ends we are going to come out of the current situation having learned to manage the virtual resources that contribute to and enrich creative and performance work.

The learning that remains from these strange times is that artistic creation has become more powerful and deeper in social scope—especially when different disciplines join forces and work is done with multiple technological resources. It is necessary to think about the art forms that are coming in the very near future.

The new ways of artistic and performative works that have emerged through virtual gathering spaces have given us ways to share our thoughts and aesthetic experiences towards the lockdown, like the expansion and resignification of time and the rage generated by brutal repression from state entities around the world. Us Colombian performers have learned that our bodies can’t be locked up. In one way or another, they will emerge from the screens to show our dignity and our right to create, express, and manifest ourselves.

****

Cuando en Colombia inició el estado de emergencia y el aislamiento preventivo, muchas organizaciones y grupos artísticos se vieron forzadxs a tomar las medidas de distanciamiento que les obligó a cerrar sus espacios físicos y cancelar los eventos organizados. Se creía que este iba a ser un año magnífico para las prácticas artísticas y culturales. Pero no fue así. El impacto fue inmediato. Fue una sorpresa para todxs lxs artistas en Colombia y así fue como comenzamos a reinventarnos.

Mientras las organizaciones y los grupos artísticos sufrieron, lxs artistas también nos hemos visto afectadxs ya que los espacios o talleres de práctica estuvieron cerrados. Como una persona no-binaria, como escritore, y performer de la ciudad de Bogotá busco hacer visibles y poder expresar mis ideas sobre el género y las normatividades sociales, viviendo en un país donde se lucha cada día contra la discriminación y la censura de distintas expresiones, me doy cuenta de que la llegada de la pandemia añadió una lucha más a estos problemas, ya que la práctica para lograr estas expresiones personales se vio afectada.

a person seated at a desk with multiple screens

Self-creative space as a place to resist! Photo by Maria Camila Astorquiza.

Entonces, ¿qué es lo que ha pasado con lxs artistas sin nuestros talleres en esta pandemia? Desde que inició el aislamiento, nos hemos dado cuenta de que aparecen bloqueos creativos relacionados a la falta de espacios como teatros, salas de ensayo, espacios en la calle. Entonces salimos de esos bloques creativos relacionándonos en conversaciones virtuales acerca de los nuevos retos, como el control de nuestros cuerpos producido por el confinamiento y las políticas de sanidad pública, conversaciones acerca de repensarnos los escenarios, nuestras obras y la reformulación de proyectos creativos con todos los recursos tecnológicos que dispongamos. Estas han sido discusiones que han ayudado a regenerar los procesos creativos y nos ha llevado a reformular nuevas formas de acercarnos al público desde el arte. Ya que los espacios físicos se han cerrado forzosamente, ha sido necesario abrir nuevos espacios virtuales donde el público pueda consumir contenido en vivo o grabado.

Es entonces cuando en medio de la pandemia nos damos cuenta de la importancia en cambiar esta realidad de pobreza cultural que no se ha hecho notar a lo largo de nuestra historia.

Una oportunidad para renovar los acercamientos de la cultura colombiana

El nuevo entretenimiento virtual es variado y va desde lo más privilegiado del arte, como la ópera, la música de cámara y los teatros nacionales, formas que llegan a jóvenes artistas quienes participan en estéticas mucho más disidentes del arte en eventos clandestinos de los países latinoamericanos. El internet y la virtualidad nos han dado la oportunidad de crear un contenido de calidad. Pero si hablamos de un país como Colombia no todo el mundo puede acceder a estas formas de arte, ya que no todo el mundo tiene el privilegio del internet. Es importante notar que, incluso, en medio de la pandemia y dada la corrupción ha habido muy poco desarrollo del país en tratar temas sensibles dentro de las distintas formas artísticas ya que es necesario hacer notar distintos temas que se hacen muy presentes como las violencias que van desde el género, las identidades, la discriminación a los pueblos indígenas, entre otras. Es entonces cuando en medio de la pandemia nos damos cuenta de la importancia en cambiar esta realidad de pobreza cultural que no se ha hecho notar a lo largo de nuestra historia.

black and white photo of two people in different masks facing each other through glass

La Tarima Invisible workshops held in Proyecto Binario. Photo by Carolina Vélez and Estefanía López.

Todo este contenido virtual que hay por descubrir ha saturado el mercado. Es como si generara esa ansiedad de estarlo consumiendo todo, todo el tiempo, pero no es así. El exceso de contenido nos mantiene a algunxs, más selectivos en lo que queremos consumir, así podemos notar como ese contenido nos da la oportunidad de desarrollar otras aptitudes y ser más creativxs.

Como artista y performer colombiane mi arte se ha visto influenciado por la música, por el trabajo corporal, como la danza y la improvisación en distintos escenarios, dentro de algunos proyectos experimentados en la pandemia creando desde todas las propuestas que hay alrededor del mundo y apropiándolas. Nos damos cuenta de que aparecen recursos creativos muy importantes con la tecnología, entonces así es como comenzamos a regenerar nuestros proyectos. Como ejemplo, proyectos que yo he desarrollado en la pandemia se relacionan con la escritura de textos que luego performo corporalmente en Instagram, son distintas emociones y sentimientos que emergen de la ansiedad producida por el encierro, al igual que algunas veces también manejo el performance desde las sensaciones de violencia causada por la represión de género y mi expresión como persona no-binaria.

Algo muy interesante ha pasado: un mundo virtual se comienza a gestar, un mundo de distintas posibilidades, un mundo sin fronteras, uno en donde las nacionalidades no importan.

La performance como un manifiesto de Rabia

Distintas agrupaciones artísticas en Colombia y América Latina se han reunido desde la virtualidad en el encierro y algo muy interesante ha pasado: un mundo virtual se comienza a gestar, un mundo de distintas posibilidades, un mundo sin fronteras, uno en donde las nacionalidades no importan. Gente de todo el mundo viene a estas reuniones virtuales a compartir sus propuestas performativas. Es una manera artística de destruir los controles que amenazan a nuestros cuerpos, tanto controles físicos como geográficos instaurados por la pandemia, incluso los problemas sociales relacionados se han determinado como gatillos de creatividad. Todas estas reuniones han representado la experiencia creativa de distintxs artistas en el encierro.

Las personas y lxs artistas en general viven inmersxs en una realidad llena de estrategias de control generadas por el sistema normativo, blanco y patriarcal que gobierna al mundo. Un ejemplo de esto es cómo la alcaldesa de Bogotá, quien de hecho es la primera alcaldesa abiertamente lesbiana de la ciudad, decidió usar una medida de control de género llamada “Pico y género” para controlar y evitar el aumento de contagios. En esta medida las personas se dividen en los dos géneros y no se les permite salir durante el intervalo de días pares e impares relacionados al género del documento de identificación. Esta restricción llevó a un aumento en la discriminación de personas trans, no-binares y personas que no sienten identificación con ningún género. La medida llevó a que la policía cometiera hechos violentos. Además, también se le suma la negligencia de distintos sectores como el de la salud, pues siempre han sido entidades violentas que se rehúsan a ayudar o atender a las personas de la comunidad LGBTIQ+. Este control llevó a la muerte a Alejandra Monocuco, una chica trans, que fue asesinada por la negligencia del estado y los organismos médicos de la ciudad. Este hecho ocurrió cuatro días después del asesinato de George Floyd en los Estados Unidos. Alejandra ha sido un detonador para enfrentar las injusticias sociales y el control excesivo por los mecanismos de poder en medio de la pandemia.

three actors onstage

La Tarima Invisibleworkshops held in Proyecto Binario. Photo by Carolina Vélez and Estefanía López.

Para afrontar esta realidad los artistas y activistas creamos distintas manifestaciones virtuales. Para mostrar la indignación, colectivos artísticos transfeministas se han manifestado con su trabajo artístico para generar distintos fondos de ayuda económica para la comunidad de chicas trans y trabajadoras sexuales en Colombia. Estas manifestaciones han incluido conversaciones desde el activismo social y se han llevado a cabo distintas fiestas virtuales donde la escena clandestina del género y las disidencias sexuales se hacen visibles. Aquí aparecen colectivos que representan este trabajo de creación disidente, con Las Tupamaras, Putivuelta y Balistikal, quienes han realizado distintos trabajos performativos desde el activismo social. Por ejemplo, Las Tupamaras ofrecieron un curso dentro de un programa de Diplomado en prácticas performativas, dando la oportunidad de compartir sus formas de creación performativa con otrxs artistas; la Putivuelta creó un espacio virtual para compartir distintos performances relacionados a bailes manifiestos y Balistikal abrió un espacio virtual para la comunidad LGBTIQ+ llamado “Open Mic Night” para reunir distintxs artistas en campos de la literatura, la actuación y la música.

Ahora, con todo un despliegue de recursos tecnológicos a nuestra disposición es posible producir trabajos multidisciplinarios, para reflejar el espacio-tiempo en el que nuestras luchas sociales han surgido. En la ausencia de espacios físicos, el trabajo performativo que ocurre ahora se ha llenado de posibilidades con la tecnología, herramientas, efectos visuales, archivos de sonido. Por esto la experiencia estética que se ha venido desarrollando de estas producciones e interacciones virtuales es una forma muy distinta de apreciar el trabajo artístico, a partir de esta experiencia surgen nuevas emociones y afectos relacionados a las luchas sociales que se han visibilizado. Así esté relacionado o no con las luchas sociales es una forma de experiencia que prevalecerá en las prácticas artísticas de un futuro cercano.

Como artista colombiane y en compañía de todas mis amigas artistas hemos aprendido que nuestros cuerpos no pueden ser encerrados.

Cuerpos que expresan una nueva época

Muchas agrupaciones han realizado un trabajo interesante en representar estos retos creativos desde los trabajos multidisciplinarios. Es cuando nos damos cuenta de que estas nuevas formas de creación están siendo pensadas no solo para ser performadas durante la pandemia, sino también inscribirse dentro de las practicas creativas que vienen a futuro.

Por ejemplo, Proyecto Binario es un centro cultural en la ciudad de Bogotá dedicado a la producción y planeación de proyectos y prácticas culturales en su espacio físico. De igual forma, dada la pandemia, la organización rápidamente se organizó para trabajar en un espacio virtual donde en colaboración con los colectivos: PopUp Art Colombia, Colectivo Canario y Distorsión[es], comenzaron a hacerse la siguiente pregunta: ¿Qué sucede cuando el evento escénico se ve dislocado y desplazado a un espacio virtual? Gracias a esta pregunta surge La tarima invisible, un proyecto que hace la reformulación del espacio de la escenificación desde el siguiente manifiesto:

La tarima no es un espacio, aunque tenga dimensiones espaciales. Tampoco es un objeto, aunque tenga efectos materiales. La tarima es una relación, es lo que ocurre entre lo que surge del encuentro con yo, un(x) otrx, y una situación. La tarima emerge de las relaciones implicadas en el evento escénico y, por consiguiente, es cuestión de performatividad.

Ana Contreras, quien trabaja desde el Colectivo Canario y además es creadora performativa de La Tarima Invisible, comparte su experiencia interesante sobre el tiempo de la creación en sus piezas performativas: “Ahora cuando trato de componer una estructura en mi proceso creativo es algo muy complicado, porque siento que me he diluido con el tiempo en medio de este confinamiento” Ana agrega: “Entonces, cuando mis procesos van a través del cuerpo, la liquidez y la solidez del tiempo se ven reflejadas en mi trabajo”.

an actor onstage

Ana Contreras in La Tarima Invisible. Photo by Juan Pablo Andrade.

Nos queda un aprendizaje muy interesante de estos tiempos tan extraños, es el hecho de que la creación artística se ha vuelto muy poderosa y profundiza en los mensajes sociales, especialmente cuando se unen distintas formas artísticas para realizar un trabajo creativo con ayuda de múltiples recursos tecnológicos. Es necesario pensar acerca de las formas del arte que se vienen para un futuro próximo.

Las nuevas maneras de crear artística y performativamente que han emergido de estas reuniones virtuales dadas por el confinamiento nos han dado la oportunidad de compartir nuestros pensamientos y nuestras experiencias estéticas en el encierro. Así como la expansión y la resignificación del tiempo y la rabia que genera la represión brutal de las entidades estatales alrededor del mundo. Como artista colombiane y en compañía de todas mis amigas artistas hemos aprendido que nuestros cuerpos no pueden ser encerrados. De una u otra forma, nuestros cuerpos emergerán de las pantallas para mostrar esa dignidad y ese derecho a crear, expresar y manifestarnos.

Bookmark this page

Log in to add a bookmark
Thoughts from the curator

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on many artists’ livelihoods, but especially performance and theatre artists. From the lens of a group of queer artists, this series offers a hyper-specific look at how artists living in Bogotá have been surviving and adapting during the pandemic. What have Colombian artists learned from this crisis and how can it inform their own practices? What are the similarities and differences between how the pandemic is playing out in Colombia and the United States, and how can that help us understand the gravity of our global pandemic? How does systemic injustice factor into the relationship between artists and the state in a time of crisis? With the articles published in both English and Spanish, this series is intended for two audiences: the broader theatre community in Colombia and the Latinx artist community based in the United States.

****

COVID-19 ha hecho estragos para el sustento de muches artistes, especialmente artistes de performance y teatro. Desde las perspectivas de un grupo de artistes cuir, esta serie ofrece una vista hiperespcífica de cómo artistes que vivien en Bogotá han estado sobreviviendo y adaptandose durante la pandemia. ¿Qué han aprendido les artistes colombianes por la crisis y cómo esto puede influir en nuestras prácticas? ¿Cuáles son las similitudes y las diferencias de ambos contextos que nos pueden ayudar a entender la gravedad de nuestra pandemia mundial? ¿Cómo afecta la injusticia sistémica la relación entre artistes y el estadodurante un tiempo de crisis? Con todos los artículos traducidos en inglés y español, esta serie tiene la intención de dos audiencias: la comunidad de teatro más amplio en Colombia y la comunidad de artistxs latinx en los Estados Unidos

Theatre in Quarantine / Teatro en Cuarentena

Interested in following this conversation in real time? Receive email alerting you to new threads and the continuation of current threads.

subscribe

Comments

0
Add Comment

The article is just the start of the conversation—we want to know what you think about this subject, too! HowlRound is a space for knowledge-sharing, and we welcome spirited, thoughtful, and on-topic dialogue. Find our full comments policy here

Newest First